PETALE

Paris, France 2012

 

The Pétale lamp was created together with Studio Odile Decq and Luceplan for the P8 Pavilion; a multifunctional centre on the banks of the Saône in Lyon, France.

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Studio Odile Decq

Luceplan

Designed whilst under the mentorship of French architect Odile Decq, the Pétale lamp was created in close collaboration with Luceplan for the P8 Pavilion; a multifunctional centre on the banks of the Saône in Lyon, France.

Pétale could be defined as a gracefully suspended petal that spreads soft, smooth white light. But the truly extraordinary feature of this object with an organic form is the way it absorbs sound. The body of the lamp, covered with white fabric, is made with a sound-absorbing panel. The dome that supports the optic is in polycarbonate. While it is ideal for use in compositions of multiple ‘light petals’ in large spaces for hospitality and socializing, Pétale also performs its multiple functions perfectly as a ‘soloist’ in any inhabited context.

Background noise – particularly in modern buildings – can often be uncomfortably loud, due to the predominance of sound-reflecting materials.

The design of the room (shape, furnishings, surface finishes, etc.) influences the extent to which the sound level decreases in relation to distance. An unfurnished room with sound reflective surfaces, such as a church, is perceived as being more reverberant than a well-furnished living room.

The materials used in Pétale provide sound absorption and prevent acoustic overlap, particularly in the case of human speech, which lies in the frequency range between 200 and over 3000 hertz (Hz). In this area the lamp achieves its best results thanks to its structure, which makes the sound waves “bounce” inside it. A conversation taking place immediately below the lamp benefits from a high level of speech clarity, and general comfort is guaranteed.

 

All images and text © Studio Odile Decq / Luceplan  

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